...an example of a 'typical' therapy experience:

I will make an assumption here that the therapist you see works broadly from  a 'humanistic' theoretical background:


A therapist working in an integrative way is likely to allow space for you to explore your issues at your own speed. 


He or she will attentively listen in a supportive way, try to understand how things are for you, and together begin to consider patterns in your life.  This may help any underlying issues become clearer, and help you consider your thoughts & feelings in a new way.  This is a very important part of the work and can take some time.  


When the time is right, you and your therapist may decide together to use various tools or techniques to explore issues at greater depth.  This might lead to deeper understandings, a sense of really getting in touch with yourself.  If making change is appropriate and you wish it, your therapist may work with you at this stage to generate clear goals, develop strategies to achieve them, and finally offer support as you take steps to achieve your goals.  This may involve a number of techniques or approaches selected to help the most.


Caveat! These things may not happen in the above order, or at all.  It all depends on you and the reasons you enter therapy and, of course, on your clinicians approach and training.  This is intended just to give an idea of what you might expect.

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